The Diary of a Nurse in the MIM Program: Fishing Village Visit, Ha Long Bay, Vietnam

A group of us signed up for an overnight stay on a junk in Ha Long Bay, Vietnam, and had the option to visit a fishing village before we got back to port. Five USD per person was the cost of the fishing village/cave tour. Our tour guide explained that the fishing village puts the money from these tours toward the cost of hiring a teacher from the nearest town to provide their children with an education. We transferred from the little shuttle boat that was attached to the side of the junk to an even smaller boat owned by one of the families in the fishing village. A father and son, both locals in the village, took us to see a few of the nearby caves.

The father explained that he has many sons and this one driving the boat is his youngest. His mother is 102 and is still alive and well — we passed her on the way back. She waved to us from her squatting position on a houseboat. There are seven generations of this family living in the fishing village. The men and women tend to marry people from the same village. They catch a variety of sea food to sell for income and store it in baskets and nets in the floating decks of their homes.

Photo op with our cave tour guide "the father"

The team piled into the fishing boat. The driver is the guide's youngest son.

Water peddlers came up to our fishing boat

Entering one of the caves

The first cave takes us to a magnificent rock-enclosed cove

Supposedly they filmed one of the newer James Bond's movies here

Headed under another cave

The floating house we passed with our guide's 102 year old mom waving at us

Looking at his own seafood catches

Inspection of their seafood collection

There was debate on this fish - we were told they were sharks

An assortment of seafood being stored until market day

There were plenty of questions as to what types of seafood were in the baskets

What are these? Cuttlefish?

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